Primary Sources ~ Civil Magistrates

A case of conscience concerning ministers medling with state matters in or out of their sermons resolved more satisfactorily then heretofore. (1649) by John Dury
A case of conscience resolved: concerning ministers medling with state-matters in their sermons (1649) by John Dury
A case of conscience, whether it be lawful to admit Jews into a Christian common-wealth? (1656) by John Dury
A discourse of ecclesiastical lawes (1687) by Philip Nye
A discourse of the state ecclesiastical of this kingdom, in relation to the civil. (1664) by Calybute Downing
A payre of compasses for church and state (1642) by Charles Herle
Davids prayer for Solomon (1643) by Joseph Caryl
Lex, rex: The law and the prince. A dispute for the just prerogative of king and people (1644) by Samuel Rutherford
Monarchy no creature of Gods making, &c. Wherein is proved by Scripture and reason, that the monarchicall goverment is against the minde of God (1651) by John Cook
Of resisting the lavvfull magistrate under colour of religion, and appendant to it, or the word krima, rendred damnation, Rom. 13 (1646) by Henry Hammond
Prudent silence a sermon preached in Mercers Chappel to the lord mayor and city, Jan. 14, 1648 (1660) by Cornelius Burges
Queen Esthers resolves: or A princely pattern of heaven-born resolution, for all the lovers of God and their country (1646) by Richard Heyrick
Severall tracts (1646) by Henry Hammond
Solomons choice: or, A president for kings and princes, and all that are in authority, presented in a sermon (1644) by Lazarus Seaman
The best and the worst magistrate: or, The people’s happiness and unhappiness, laid open in a sermon (1648) by Obadiah Sedgwick
The bounds & bonds of publique obedience (1649) by Francis Rous
The good of a good government, and well grounded peace (1645) by John Foxcroft
The great interest of states & kingdomes (1646) by Thomas Goodwin
The king’s authority in dispensing with ecclesiastical laws, asserted and vindicated (1687) by Philip Nye
The lavvfulnes of obeying the present government (1649) by Francis Rous